Public-Domain

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If you, like me, are in e-commerce, one of our main concern is “public-domain” when using work of art images.  ALL of the paintings by the old Renaissance Masters are in the public domain; however, if you are using a photo of a painting, that photo may not be in public domain, even if it is in the internet, and sometimes those photos are protected by a copyright.

Thankfully, in the beginning of this year the Metropolitan Museum of art made its images freely available through New Open Access policy, making our lives a little easier, here is about the policy, and how to obtain those images: Images of Artworks in the Public Domain

 

Work of Art: The Next Great Artist – Training our eyes

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Hi everyone,

There is something I would like to share with you all: I started watching this series called “Work of Art: The next Great Artist” by Bravo, and it’s become evident to me that most of the artists competing have not trained their eyes to good art.

I always tell artists the importance to train their eyes to good art, especially the classical (well-skilled) movements like: Baroque, Renaissance, also Impressionism.  Even if you are an urbanist artist, futurist artist, abstract artist go to the museums of classical art, read books about the great masters, contemplate their work, learn their process, study their techniques; this way you can train your eyes to high skilled art, developing a critical sense of aesthetics,  helping to bring their greatness to your movement, improving your style, and becoming indeed a Great Artist.

 

The ISMS in Art I – RENAISSANCE: Humanism

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Humanism, similar to Renaissance itself, has two main characteristics: first is the revival of interest in art and the values of the Classical world, and the second is the renewed sense of the individual’s ability to understand and change both himself and the world by seeking rational rather than religious aspect of life.

The term “Humanism” was first used in the 14th century to refer to teachers of Roman liberal arts (geometry, grammar, poetry, rhetoric and moral philosophy). Although it was primarily a scholarly movement, Humanism started to provoke a new interest in artists, and gradually beginning the transition from where artists were considered craftsmen to where artists found their inner voices discovering they had significant things to say about the world they so far had only observed.

By emphasisng the importance of reason and rational, Humanism challenged the traditional domination of theology with its elevation of the Divine and prostration of the earthly as sinful and corrupt.  Artists began to represent holiness in ordinary people, portraying the Virgin as a humble girl, God as a merciful senior, bringing Heaven closer to humans.

Humanism was a very scientific movement, they believed in education, they were convinced that the human’s mind could grasp the logical patterns of the universe.  Such reasoning inspired the belief that art could be codified into rules for the purposes of teaching.  This, in turn, led to the founding of art Academies to ensure the correct application of such rules, creating lots of great artist-intellectuals.

Some of the Artists:

  •  Giovanni Bellini
  • Donatello
  • Domenico Ghirlandaio
  • Giorgione
  • Leonardo Da Vinci
  • Michelangelo Buonarroti
  • Raphael Sanzio
  • Tintoretto
  • Titian

 

 

The ISMS in Art I – RENAISSANCE: Monumentalism

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Monumental art is defined by its physical scale, the breadth of its subject matter and its ambition to be of lasting significance.  During the Renaissance, powerful patrons encouraged the development of monumental art, a trend which continued into the Baroque era.

Pope Julius, initiated the monumentalism of the High Renaissance when he commissioned the architect Bramante to rebuild St. Peters in Rome. With political ambitions the Pope instructed Bramante to design and build something which would dwarf all the most significant monumental buildings of the ancient world, including the Parthenon and the Basilica of Constantine.

Michelangelo also excelled in monumental painting and sculpture.  His frescoes in the Sistine Chapel feature hundreds of nudes arranged into an epic narrative of man’s creation, fall, redemption and judgement.  His giant figures all have heroically muscular bodies.  Michelangelo’s David, the first monumental Renaissance sculpture, measures four meters high and was commissioned as a symbol of the Florentine Republic.

As you can see Renaissance Monumentalism was meant to constitute a grandiose power; by its commissioner and also, and most importantly, by its creator.

Some of the Artists:

  • Leon Battista Alberti
  • Donato Bramante
  • Filippo Brunelleschi
  • Lorenzo Ghiberti
  • Giorgione
  • Hugo Van Der Goes
  • Andrea Mantegna
  • Michelangelo Buonarroti
  • Raffaello Sanzio (Raphael)
  • Tintoretto

 

 

 

The ISMS in Art I – RENAISSANCE: Secularism

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Secularism is a general tendency to discuss human relationships – private and public – independently of religious values, customs and institutions.

During the Renaissance most of the art and architecture were commissioned by the Catholic Church, which its main intent was to promote its doctrine; being holder of great resources and riches soon became impossible to separate art from theology.  When easel painting grew in popularity, it helped to increase private commissions, releasing artists from producing “religious” art and that was when Secularism was born.

Important contemporary events, with a focus on prominent public figures, provided an obvious source of secular subject matter during the Renaissance.  Other factor in the secularization of Renaissance art include: urbanization; the consolidation of secular power; increasing wealth which created new patrons for the arts; and the steady growth of a market in art which explored Classical themes, imagery and principles. This secular trend flourished a century later in the Baroque era.

 

Some of the Artists:

  • Leon Battista Alberti
  • Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio
  • Sandro Botticelli
  • Donato Bramante
  • Filippo Brunelleschi
  • Vittore Carpaccio
  • Donatello
  • Giorgione
  • Andrea Mantegna
  • Michelangelo Buonarroti
  • Sebastiano Del Piombo
  • Titan

 

The ISMS in Art I – RENAISSANCE: Classicism

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Classicism (neoclassicism) was heavily influenced by the art of the classical antiquity. The artists wanted to distance themselves from the middle ages cultural decline, they started to study the ancient societies and became particularly fascinated with the values of classical Greek and Roman art.

Renaissance Classicism is also characterized by a revival of classical subject matter such as mythological, religious and historical figures. And because of it we are able to appreciate (today) many of art works majestically portraying classical scenes from the bible.

Classical art is renowned for its harmony, balance, correct proportions, lifelikeness and its sense of movement, all of which assist to attain absolute grace and beauty.  Some artists even made use of mathematical rations to achieve a symmetrical and unified design.  The movement helped to resuscitate the belief that nature is governed by rational laws which we can apply to our own creations; combining science, mathematics and art once more.

Some of the Artists:

  • Leon Battista Alberti
  • Sandro Botticelli
  • Donato Bramante
  • Filippo Brunelleschi
  • Donatello
  • Andrea Mantegna
  • Masaccio
  • Michelangelo
  • Raphael
  • Perugino
  • Titian